Research tools

Patients’ Attitudes Towards Deprescribing questionnaires

 

Read about the tool

Name of resource/tool: Patients’ Attitudes Towards Deprescribing (PATD), revised PATD (older adults and caregivers versions) and the rPATDcog (version for people with cognitive impairment) questionnaires

Who developed it e.g. name(s)/organisation: Dr Emily Reeve (Lead), University of South Australia (PATD), University of Sydney (rPATD, rPATDcog).

See manuscripts below for full author team.

Year developed/published: 2013-2019

Country of origin: Australia

Purpose of the resource/tool (short description): To capture self-reported attitudes towards deprescribing.

Funder(s): The PATD questionnaire was developed Dr Reeve during her PhD candidacy, funded by an Australian Postgraduate Award (APA).

The rPATD research was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre (CDPC). The CDPC receives support from the NHMRC and funding partners, including HammondCare, Alzheimer’s Australia, Brightwater Care Group and Helping Hand Aged Care.

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis or the manuscripts.

How was the resource/tool developed and validated: The original PATD underwent face, content, criterion, internal validity, and sensitivity and reliability testing. The questionnaire was then revised due to limitations of the original PATD (designed to be exploratory, no scoring ability, limited scope of potential barriers and enablers) and to simultaneously develop a version for informal caregivers. The rPATD underwent face, construct, content and criterion-related validity testing and internal and test-retest consistency. See manuscripts below for full details.

Peer‐reviewed evidence (e.g. has it been published in a peer-reviewed journal): Yes

Reeve, Emily, et al. “Development and validation of the patients’ attitudes towards deprescribing (PATD) questionnaire.” International journal of clinical pharmacy 35.1 (2013): 51-56.

Reeve, Emily, et al. “Development and validation of the revised patients’ attitudes towards deprescribing (rPATD) questionnaire: versions for older adults and caregivers.” Drugs & aging 33.12 (2016): 913-928.

Reeve, Emily, et al. “Development and pilot testing of the revised Patients’ Attitudes Towards Deprescribing questionnaire for people with cognitive impairment.” Australasian journal on ageing 37.4 (2018): E150-E154.

Reeve, Emily, et al. “People’s attitudes, beliefs, and experiences regarding polypharmacy and willingness to deprescribe.” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 61 (2013): 1508-1514

Reeve, Emily, et al. “Development and pilot testing of the revised Patients’ Attitudes Towards Deprescribing questionnaire for people with cognitive impairment.” Australasian journal on ageing 37 (2018): E150-E154

Copyright information or other details about permission for others to use: Please seek permission from the contact person to use.

Name of contact person: Emily Reeve

Email address of contact person: Emily.Reeve@unisa.edu.au

 

Medicines Conversation Guide

 

  • Medicines Conversation Guide 
  • Pharmacist Resource Pack, including:
    • Training videos to use the Medicines Conversation Guide in a mock medication review
    • Tips for the Home Medicines Review report
    • Home Medicines Review report template
    • Patients’ goals summary template
    • Strategies for communication challenges
  • Training videos to use the Medicines Conversation Guide in a mock medication review
Read about the tool

Name of resource/tool: Medicines Conversation Guide

Who developed it e.g. name(s): Dr Kristie Weir (Sydney University), Assoc/Prof Jesse Jansen (Sydney University), Prof Kirsten McCaffery (Sydney University), Prof Vasi Naganathan (Sydney University), Dr Carissa Bonner (Sydney University), Prof Stacy Carter (University of Wollongong), Debbie Rigby (Queensland University of Technology), Prof Lyndal Trevena (Sydney University), Prof McLachlan (Sydney University), Prof Les Irwig (Sydney University), Isabelle Baker (Sydney University),  Jim Colvin (Health Consumers NSW)

This multi-disciplinary research team involves experts in primary care, geriatrics and pharmacy, qualitative methodology, health literacy, epidemiology, ethics and behavioural science, and a health consumer representative.

Year developed/published: 2019

Country of origin: Australia

Purpose of the resource/tool (short description): Medicines Conversation Guide is a tool designed to support conversations about older adults’ goals and preferences, and to improve the appropriate use of medicines.

Funder(s): This work was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council grant. K.W. was supported by a Sydney Medical School ECR PhD scholarship. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis or the manuscript.

How was the resource/tool developed and validated: Development and feasibility of the Medicines Conversation Guide as an additional component of a medication review for older people taking multiple medicines. The acceptability and implementation of the Guide was assessed from the perspective of pharmacists, older patients and their caregiver, and general practitioners. The full development and feasibility process can be found in the below peer-reviewed journal article.

Peer‐reviewed evidence (e.g. has it been published in a peer-reviewed journal): Yes

Weir K, Bonner C, McCaffery K, Naganathan V, Carter SM, Rigby D, Trevena L, McLachlan A, Jansen J. Pharmacists and patients sharing decisions about medicines: Development and feasibility of a conversation guide. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, Volume 15, Issue 6, Pages 682-690, June 2019 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sapharm.2018.08.009

Copyright information or other details about permission for others to use: Please seek permission from the contact person to use.

Name of contact person: Kristie Weir

Email address of contact person: kristie.weir@sydney.edu.au

 

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